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Thursday, 14 December 2017

The emerging Sid Valley Neighbourhood Plan > boosting affordable housing > protecting green spaces

The Herald has been featuring pieces on the 'emerging' Neighbourhood Plan - the first focussing on Port Royal and Knowle:
Futures Forum: The emerging Sid Valley Neighbourhood Plan > providing ‘vital data’ to inform the Port Royal scoping study > using evidence collected to submit a ‘substantial objection’ to the Knowle planning inquiry

The second looked at housing and both the built and natural environments:



Sidmouth and Ottery breaking news and sport - Sidmouth Herald

Here is the complete press release from the NP steering group:


Sid Valley Neighbourhood Plan

In this second article, Neighbourhood Plan Steering Group member Peter Murphy talks with colleagues about one of the major points arising from consultations: the housing situation. He notes that Government Guidelines state:

 “Neighbourhood planning gives communities direct power to develop a shared vision for their neighbourhood and shape the development and growth of their local area. They are able to choose where they want new homes, shops and offices to be built, have their say on what those new buildings should look like and what infrastructure should be provided, and grant planning permission for the new buildings they want to see go ahead. Neighbourhood planning provides a powerful set of tools for local people to ensure that they get the right types of development for their community where the ambition of the neighbourhood is aligned with the strategic needs and priorities of the wider local area.”

Reflecting on the difficulty of achieving a balanced housing stock in the valley considering our population balance and constraints on the amount of land available for building, Councillor Michael Earthey who heads up the Housing Theme group had this to say:

“Young people and first-time buyers trying to start family life find it difficult to get the first step onto the property ladder. It’s a national problem but in the Sid Valley there are locally contributing factors – not least the current and forecast demographics of the Valley.  We have a preponderance of people in the age group 60 years and above and forecasts indicate that this will continue to rise.  Let’s face it:  the Sid Valley is a highly desirable place to come and retire and an attractive proposition for those who can sell up where house prices are higher, buy here and have capital left over. Or indeed, to buy a second home or holiday let – both factors which have an influence on the year-round viability of a sustainable local economy.

A Neighbourhood Plan cannot write policies which will influence or control the existing free housing market where supply and demand determines prices.  But based on analysis of our independently commissioned housing needs survey together with community views, our draft plan - if approved - will include policies which:

·         Impose requirements on the make-up of new-builds including for example for those with more than 10 homes, detailing the percentage mix of affordable, intermediate and open market housing (or other affordable housing which may include ownership solutions such as shared housing or shared equity)

·         Support social housing proposed by developers.

·         Regulate the ownership of second or holiday homes in a manner similar to the St Ives Neighbourhood Plan which has survived legal challenge and is now in statute.

Overall our objective is to ensure that the right housing is built in the right place and the natural beauty of the Valley is not endangered.”

Graham Cooper, who has responsibility for developing the policies which will regulate how our Built and Natural Environments are developed yet remain unspoiled commented:

“For me our main problem will be the risk of settlement creep within the valley because of the demands for housing and employment in the coming years. We are doing what we can within the framework of the Neighbourhood Plan to write policies which may protect us from development encroaching into our green areas.  Another issue facing our environment which we will try to address is loss of tree canopy in new developments.  The concept of Eco-corridors is taking shape however which will contribute to a healthy bio-diversity in the area.”

________________________________________________________________

For further information contact Deirdre Hounsom, Chair, Sid Valley Neighbourhood Plan at d.hounsom@hotmail.com or by phone: 07970 814568


NeighbourHood Plan - Sidmouth Town Council
Sid Valley Neighbourhood Plan – Shaping our Future Together
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Knowle relocation project: PegasusLife appeal inquiry >>> decision expected end of January

The decision from the Inspector considering the appeal by the developers at Knowle is expected next month:
Futures Forum: Knowle relocation project: PegasusLife appeal inquiry >>> decision expected soon

This follows on from a site visit:
Futures Forum: Knowle relocation project: PegasusLife appeal inquiry >>> site visit 1.30pm: Tuesday 5th December

A local resident gave his take on the sorry tale:
Futures Forum: Knowle relocation project: PegasusLife appeal inquiry >>> "the Sidmouth community have been badly treated and let down" >>> a summary of the issues

Here is another overview of the current process, posted by Save Our Sidmouth:


Knowle decision to be made known by end of January 2018

December 13, 2017
by sidmouthsidLeave a comment

The Planning Inspectorate has indicated to EDDC that the decision will be issued on or before 31 January 2018.

Many people who couldn’t attend the Inquiry themselves due to work or other commitments, have asked for more information about it. So thank you to the correspondent who sent in this summary of his own experience of the process, and some reflections which we believe are widely shared, on where we are now:


‘The inquiry into the appeal by PegasusLife for their development of the Knowle site, which is supposed to pay for EDDC’s move to Honiton, has concluded with a site visit by the Inspector. The decision will not be known until early in the new year, but it is a good time to reflect on the process.

The overwhelming feeling has been that the Council’s barrister, still a junior in barrister terms, has had to fight against the developer’s QC, clearly one of the most experienced in the field, with one hand tied behind his back. At times it was akin to watching David take on Goliath.

The first obstacle was that the EDDC planning officers went back on their original decision and recommended that the scheme should be approved. Despite the strength of the arguments of local protesters which convinced planning committee rebels to vote against the leadership’s pet project, the developer’s QC kept using the officers’ opinions to chip away the defence.

Although two conservative rebels voted with concerned locals, the leadership of the planning committee managed to restrict the reasons for refusing the plans and this limited the problems the developers had to answer. Arguments about the town needing affordable homes and pressure on local services through even more pensioners moving in did not have to be countered.

Then we had the Council’s own defence which, to be kind, many interested parties regarded as poorly prepared. More than once the developer’s QC was able to exploit wrong information or the wrong document provided to the EDDC barrister.

The developer’s QC was backed by a team of expert witnesses who were well rehearsed and difficult to trip up. The Council’s barrister had a planning officer brought in from Cornwall, the EDDC officers were disqualified because they had recommended approval, and a heritage officer. The planning officer didn’t know the area and was playing catch up on the details of a very large and complex development, he didn’t stand much chance against the developers who had devised the scheme. The heritage officer was torn to pieces by the forensic questions of the QC, possibly because she had not had sufficient training in how to present evidence against a barrage of aggressive questioning.

Once again, local people and organisations marshalled arguments to have this gross over-development thrown out. We will have to wait for the outcome. If we have lost, the developer could walk off with massive profits and yet avoid any responsibility to pay an estimated sum of three and a half million pounds towards those affordable homes which East Devon needs so desperately.’


Knowle decision to be made known by end of January 2018 | Save Our Sidmouth
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Climate change: learning resources from Sustainability Frontiers

'Sustainability Frontiers is an international alliance of sustainability and global educators', with its main centre in Weston, Sidmouth. It is particularly interested in education issues around climate change. Here are some extracts from its latest newsletter:

TRANSGRESSIVE EDUCATION FOR A PLANETARY ETHIC OF PEACE, ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL JUSTICE Sustainability FrontiersLinkedIn logofacebookFollow us on twitter header

Sustainability Frontiers engages in research and innovation in the broad fields of education for sustainability, transformative environmental education and global education, transgressing dominant assumptions and current orthodoxies as it seeks to foster learner empowerment and action. It places particular emphasis on climate change, disaster risk reduction and peacebuilding and their implications for the nature and directions of sustainability education.


Greetings!

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Pictured here is a daffodil, potent and heartwarming symbol of English springtime. This daffodil came into bloom just over a week ago, on 27 November 2017. It is being followed by a procession of daffodils in yellow bud. In recent years we in our English south coast clime have seen daffodils in bloom for the Winter Solstice but this, for us, breaks all records. Its appearance elicits conflicting emotions; joy, on the one hand, at seeing a flower of sublime beauty lighting up dark, dank winter days; a sense of dread, on the other, at the creeping advance of climate breakdown.

‘Climate breakdown’ not ‘climate change’ more and more feels the right term. We are facing the dislocation of nature, loss of species and the disruption of ecosystems and of food chains. Human populations in many parts of the world are facing life-threatening food security threats triggering climate migration on a huge scale. Climate change education - aimed at mitigating the drivers of climate change while helping those to adapt who are on the frontline in suffering its effects  – becomes more and more urgent.



Climate Change Learning Resource Review

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A new review article by David Selby has just been published in Policy & Practice: A Development Education Review, Autumn 2017. The article reviews the highly innovative Creating Futures: 10 Lessons Inspiring Inquiry, Creativity & Cooperation in Response to Climate Change for Senior Primary Classrooms, jointly published by Trócaire and the Centre for Human Rights and Citizenship Education of Dublin City University in 2016.
For details, click here
For the review, click here.






Teaching Teens About Climate Change

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A new Green Teacher (Canada) e-book, Teaching Teens About Climate Change, edited by Tim Grant and Gail Littlejohn has just been published. The publication offers a rich treasure chest of wonderful ideas for climate change learning and teaching. We are delighted that our own article and activities, 'Climate Change Learning: Unleashing Blessed Unrest as the Heating Happens’, as originally published in Green Teacher, Issue 94, Fall 2011, are included in the book (pp. 8-23).
For details of Teaching Teens About Climate Change, click here.
For the original 2011 Green Teacher article, click here.






Place-based Nature Learning: Best Practice Wanted!

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The Sustainability Frontiers team of David Selby and Fumiyo Kagawa are in process of researching and authoring a book on place-based nature learning covering the learning of both children and adults.
Varieties of nature learning being covered in the book include: localized nature-connected learning; nature-grounded sustainability learning; localized climate change education; re-wilding learning; localized biodiversity learning; learning alternative life ways; alternative forms of food production; celebration, ritual and symbol in earth-connected learning.
We are also looking for evidence of child disconnection from the natural world and of ways in which teachers and other significant adults are working to overcome that disconnection.
The team, in short, is looking for examples of best practice whether in rural or urban contexts. If you have practice to share do get in touch and let’s have a conversation! To contact the SF team, click here.

Bulletin 20, 11 December 2017

Sustainability Frontiers - ‘Go out on a limb… That’s where the blossom grows’ – Tom Forsyth, Isle of Eigg, Inner Hebrides, Scotland *

The group took part in last year's Climate Week:
Vision Group for Sidmouth - Climate Week in Sidmouth: The Climate Variety Show: update
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Climate change: and impacts on national security from increased maritime access to the Arctic, rising sea levels, desertification > 'means more failed states, more terrorist organizations, and more bases destroyed by flooding'

Climate change is changing the face of geopolitics:
Futures Forum: Climate change: and 'security'
Futures Forum: Climate change: National Security and the Accelerating Risks of Climate Change
Futures Forum: Climate change: and "contributing to creating the kind of fragile environments in which terrorist groups can thrive"

The latest bill from the American president contrasts with his administration's stance on climate change:

Trump’s new defense bill includes a dire warning on climate change




Climate change means more failed states, more terrorist organizations, and more bases destroyed by flooding, according to the US military. (Staff Sgt. Trevor T. McBride/ U.S. Air Force via AP)

WRITTEN BYZoë Schlanger
13 DEC 2017

US president Donald Trump signed the National Defense Authorization Act on Tuesday (Dec 13), a bill that sets policy for the US military for the coming fiscal year. Surprisingly, the bill contains a sizable discussion of climate change.

In the bill, current and former top US military brass attest to the national security threat of a rapidly changing climate. By signing the bill, Trump also ordered a report on “vulnerabilities to military installations” that climate change could cause in the next 20 years.

The bill’s acknowledgement and anticipation of climate change as an urgent threat contrasts sharply the Trump administration’s past denial. The administration has scrubbed mentions of climate change from agency websites, blocked federal scientists from presenting research on the topic, and top Trump officials—like energy secretary Rick Perry and environment chief Scott Pruitt—have stated their denial of the mainstream scientific consensus that human activity is warming the planet.

“As global temperatures rise, droughts and famines can lead to more failed states, which are breeding grounds of extremist and terrorist organizations,” the bill reads. “In the Marshall Islands, an Air Force radar installation built on an atoll at a cost of $1,000,000,000 is projected to be underwater within two decades.”

“A three-foot rise in sea levels will threaten the operations of more than 128 United States military sites, and it is possible that many of these at-risk bases could be submerged in the coming years,” it continues. “In the Arctic, the combination of melting sea ice, thawing permafrost, and sea-level rise is eroding shorelines, which is damaging radar and communication installations, runways, seawalls, and training areas.”

Secretary of defense James Mattis is quoted saying that the consequences of climate change “impact our security situation.” Gordon Sullivan, former chief of staff of the US Army, is quoted as saying climate change will “lead to instability in geopolitics and impact American military operations around the world.”

Read the full text of the defense bill’s climate change section below:

SEC. 335. REPORT ON EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE.

(a) Findings.—Congress makes the following findings:

(1) Secretary of Defense James Mattis has stated: “It is appropriate for the Combatant Commands to incorporate drivers of instability that impact the security environment in their areas into their planning.”.

(2) Secretary of Defense James Mattis has stated: “I agree that the effects of a changing climate — such as increased maritime access to the Arctic, rising sea levels, desertification, among others — impact our security situation.”.

(3) Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joseph Dunford has stated: “It’s a question, once again, of being forward deployed, forward engaged, and be in a position to respond to the kinds of natural disasters that I think we see as a second or third order effect of climate change.”.

(4) Former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has stated: “Over the next 20 years and more, certain pressures-population, energy, climate, economic, environmental-could combine with rapid cultural, social, and technological change to produce new sources of deprivation, rage, and instability.”.

(5) Former Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army Gordon Sullivan has stated: “Climate change is a national security issue. We found that climate instability will lead to instability in geopolitics and impact American military operations around the world.”.

(6) The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) has stated: “Many countries will encounter climate-induced disruptions—such as weather-related disasters, drought, famine, or damage to infrastructure—that stress their capacity to respond, cope with, or adapt. Climate-related impacts will also contribute to increased migration, which can be particularly disruptive if, for example, demand for food and shelter outstrips the resources available to assist those in need.”.


Trump's new defense bill includes a dire warning on climate change — Quartz

The ironies have not escaped notice:
President Just Signed Bill That Says Climate Change a National Security Risk, But Does He Know That? - Ecowatch
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Climate change: the 2017 Arctic Report Card shows 'unprecedented warming'

The notion that global warming rates were slowing down now seem to have been disproved:
Evidence Mounts Against So-Called Climate Change Hiatus

This has been confirmed with the latest research from the Arctic:
Warming of the Arctic is ‘unprecedented over the last 1,500 years,’ scientists say - The Washington Post

From the Independent:

Arctic climate 'report card' reveals ‘rapid and dramatic changes’ to the polar environment

Warming temperatures represent 'an emerging new normal' for the region, warns the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


Josh Gabbatiss Science Correspondent
a day ago




Significant reductions in sea ice pose a threat to the animals that call the Arctic their home Sepp Friedhuber/Getty Images

The devastating impact of climate change in the polar regions has been confirmed by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) annual Arctic Report Card. Authors from the American scientific agency concluded that 2017 was not a record-breaking year in terms of climate extremes, there was still evidence that the Arctic is warming at twice the rate of the global average. The widespread environmental changes that arise as a result of this warming are beginning to define “an emerging new normal” in the region, the report said.

READ MORE

UK must do more to combat climate change, say indigenous leaders
From the Arctic’s melting ice, an unexpected digital hub
Arctic Ocean fishing ban welcomed by scientists and environmentalists


The year saw close to the warmest air temperatures ever recorded – second only to last year’s. There were also above average ocean temperatures, continued loss of sea ice and various negative effects on the people and ecosystems of the Arctic. Aside from the lowest ever measurements for maximum winter sea ice area, the authors reveal that ice is also getting thinner every year.

The report was released at the American Geophysical Union’s autumn conference in New Orleans. “The rapid and dramatic changes we continue to see in the Arctic present major challenges and opportunities,” said Dr Timothy Gallaudet, acting NOAA administrator. “This year’s Arctic Report Card is a powerful argument for why we need long-term sustained Arctic observations to support the decisions that we will need to make to improve the economic well-being for Arctic communities, national security, environmental health and food security.”

The peer-reviewed report is made up of work from over 80 scientists from 12 nations, and aims to provide the most up-to-date information on the current status of the Arctic. It is produced every year by NOAA in order to provide a general update on the region’s status and inform decision making. This year, the publication also includes special reports on the impact of warming on the highly valuable Eastern Bering Sea fisheries, wildfires in the Arctic and the permafrost thaw that compromises Arctic infrastructure.

“This report is further evidence of the dramatic change occurring in the Arctic – from rapidly warming temperatures to dwindling sea ice to melting permafrost. And it’s not only the ecosystems, wildlife and people of the Arctic being affected,” said David Aplin, interim managing director for US Arctic programmes at WWF. “The path forward is clear: climate change mitigation is absolutely vital. We need to reduce emissions, end our reliance on fossil fuels, and embrace a clean energy future – for the good of our planet, its people and wildlife."


Arctic climate 'report card' reveals ‘rapid and dramatic changes’ to the polar environment | The Independent

And these pictures say it all:
Heart-Wrenching Video Shows Starving Polar Bear on Iceless Land - National Geographic
Video of starving polar bear in Canada's Arctic re-ignites conversations about climate change | Georgia Straight Vancouver's News & Entertainment Weekly
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Wednesday, 13 December 2017

Plans for Port Royal: anticipating a Regeneration Board >> budgeting for a 'renewal and resilience strategy'

Publication of the Port Royal Scoping Study report has been delayed:
Futures Forum: Plans for Port Royal: anticipating a Regeneration Board >> Town Council not to consider report as yet...
Futures Forum: Plans for Port Royal: anticipating a Regeneration Board >> Scoping Study consultants' final report presented to Reference Group > more in the press

The consultants will be reporting back to the District Council's Cabinet on 7th February with their latest version:
List of meetings 2017/2018 
Futures Forum: Plans for Port Royal: a set of information sheets available > 'to help more people know the facts and understand aspects of the potential redevelopment of Port Royal and Eastern Town'

The council will have had to pay them a little more for their services, having forgotten things like covenants and flooding issues:
Futures Forum: Plans for Port Royal: 'further investigations in respect of flooding and covenants' needed

The budgeted amount agreed to in January 2016 was £8k from the District Council and £2k from the Town Council:
Futures Forum: Plans for Port Royal: anticipating a Regeneration Board >>> ‘Scoping Report for the eastern end of Sidmouth’ to be presented to Cabinet >>> Wednesday 6th January

Five years ago, though, £30k had been committed to a 'renewal and resilience strategy' for Port Royal:

Special Overview and Scrutiny Committee 2012/13 
Budget and Service Plans 
Wednesday 18 January 2012 
SPECIAL ITEM BIDS 2012/13
RC
New Regeneration Town centre renewal and resilience strategies
£30k for each of 3 years Axminster town centre, Honiton – Visioning, high street and public realm, Sidmouth Port Royal.
30,000

held in the Council Chamber, Knowle, Sidmouth 
on Wednesday, 1 February 2012
Revenue and Capital Estimates 2012/13 – Key Decision
In response to a specific question about committing funds to the renewal of Axminster, Honiton and Sidmouth town centres, Richard Cohen, Deputy Chief Executive advised that he was aware of resource implications but there was a need to consider the on-going health of towns in addition to the regeneration of Seaton and Exmouth.


There was some debate in the Scrutiny Committee at the time:
£90k strategy could boost Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald

Meanwhile, back in August 2009:

Following the departure of its Urban Designer and the post being frozen, East Devon District Council has no internal resources to progress a development brief for the Port Royal site, says corporate director Karime Hassan, in a report before the council's executive board next Wednesday (September 2), and private consultants would have to be engaged, at an estimated cost of £60,000, to produce the brief.

Plans for Port Royal: the Drill Hall: a short modern history

The best place to go for a history - both ancient and modern - of the Drill Hall on Sidmouth's Esplanade is a specific site set up to carry out research and provide an archive of material:
Sidmouth Drill Hall Research Site - Sidmouth Drill Hall Research Site

There is also a separate 'campaign' site:
Rescue Sidmouth Drill Hall - Sidmouth Drill Hall Rescue
Mary launches new campaign to ‘rescue’ Sidmouth Drill Hall - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald

The Drill Hall is very controversial issue - with disputes over ownership and covenants:
‘They’ve stolen our Drill Hall’ - claim - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald

And a new campaign was launched this summer:
Campaigners with alternative vision for Port Royal accused of ‘scare-mongering’ - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald

The 'campaign' goes back some years, though, with the Vision Group being set up in 2005 with a primary focus on Port Royal:
The day SVA became pro-active in a Vision for Sidmouth - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald
EDDC throw out marina - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (March 2008)
Sidmouth Port Royal challenge to town's businesses and experts - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Sept 2009)
Sidmouth Vision Group hosts Port Royal events - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (June 2010)
Sidmouth Port Royal development hope - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Dec 2010)

Various amounts of money keep appearing:


Sidmouth's Port Royal redevelopment hiccup
31 August 2009
LACK of money and staff could mean redevelopment plans for Sidmouth s Port Royal area are put on hold.
Following the departure of its Urban Designer and the post being frozen, East Devon District Council has no internal resources to progress a development brief for the Port Royal site, says corporate director Karime Hassan, in a report before the council's executive board next Wednesday (September 2), and private consultants would have to be engaged, at an estimated cost of £60,000, to produce the brief.
Councillors have to decide whether Exmouth's redevelopment brief takes priority.
Mr Hassan reports: "The council has previously agreed to work with the Town Council to produce the development brief, and Sidmouth Vision (Group) and others have also signalled their interest. A lot of time will need to be invested in community consultation and the cost of the brief will need to reflect a significant investment of time."
There is no funding shown in EDDC's revenue budget for such work and the only source of potential funding would be the Local Authority Business Grant Initiative. "There is sufficient funding in the LAGBI to take forward a development brief, but it does mean less funding is available to invest in the regeneration programmes for Exmouth and Seaton," states Mr Hassan.
Unless EDDC can secure half of the money needed through match-funding, possibly through Sidmouth Town Council or the private sector, so the district's costs would be kept to £25,000, it seems the project could be mothballed.
Part of the scheme to re-develop the Ham Lane/Port Royal area would involve the acquisition of the Drill Hall site, and in February 2008 the executive decided to negotiate with the trustees of the Army Cadet Force to acquire the hall and work with the ACF to re-locate the cadets to a new HQ. Permission has been granted for a joint meeting place for ACF and ATC and rifle range at Chambers Close, Stowford Rise, but executive members will be told the scheme, together with the site value, may cost more than the Drill Hall site is worth.
Councillors will be asked to consider what priority they want to place on producing a development brief for Port Royal and signal the possibility of match-funding to the town council.


Sidmouth's Port Royal redevelopment hiccup - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald

And so the tale has wended its sorry way:
Port Royal NOT for sale says EDDC - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (March 2009)
Mystery bid for Sidmouth's Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Sept 2009)
Key agreement in Sidmouth Port Royal re-development - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Nov 2010)
Regeneration of Sidmouth’s Port Royal inches closer after £500k deal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (or £550k?? Nov 2011)
EDDC budget £48k to demolish Sidmouth’s drill hall - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Dec 2011)


£90k strategy could boost Port Royal
01 February 2012

Stefan Gordon
Sidmouth, Port Royal. Picture by Alex Walton. 
A REGENERATION pledge of £90,000 over three years could help kick-start a long-awaited bid to change the face of Sidmouth seafront.
Port Royal is one of three projects that would benefit from mooted “town centre renewal and resilience strategies” paid for by East Devon District Council (EDDC). Overview and scrutiny committee members last week ruled £30,000, for the first year of the scheme, should be catered for in the authority’s budget for 2012/13 – despite concerns from some the project was “premature”.
The funding had initially been omitted and a “special item bid” for its inclusion was made. Projects in Axminster and Honiton would also benefit.
Scrutiny committee members heard that the funding would allow ‘preparation and foundation work’ to be done for when the economy picks up.
Preliminary graft would mean Port Royal could be “ready for growth, ready for change,” said Councillor Andrew Moulding.
However, some councillors wanted to see the matter postponed for a year so ongoing regeneration schemes in Exmouth and Seaton could progress more.
“I’m not against the principle but the timing - it is not now,” said Cllr Philip Skinner. Cllr Roger Giles praised an “excellent initiative” but said: “It’s a question of timing. If you agree this, you are agreeing £30,000 for three years – so it’s £90,000. I’d be delighted to support it, but it’s premature.”
Backing the bid for funding, Cllr Stuart Hughes said: “It’s time to prepare for the future and kick start the Port Royal development – it’s very important for the town.”
Cllr Graham Troman added: “People in Sidmouth are forever talking about what we’re going to do. We need to be working on it.”
Councillors voted seven to four in favour of recommending the cash be included in the budget. 
EDDC’s cabinet will make a final decision of the issue.


Bid to save ‘iconic’ Sidmouth seafront building
09 May 2012
Stefan Gordon
Louise, Hattie, Kate, Matt, Darcie and Coco at the Sidmouth Drill Hall protesting against the council's plans to replace the derelict building with a car park. Picture by Alex Walton. 
YOUNG families have launched a bid to save Sidmouth’s “iconic” seafront Drill Hall from demolition.

A group of friends turned campaigners want the community to decide the fate of the 117-year-old building – and feel the bid can unite generations.
East Devon District Council (EDDC) members earmarked £48,000 to flatten the venue - branded “unsafe and unusable” - four months ago. A temporary car park was suggested for the site. However, the authority told the Herald yesterday that there were currently “no plans” for the hall.

The prime site is viewed as a key in the regeneration of Port Royal.
EDDC took ownership of the site last year in a land swap deal that saw it spend £500,000 on a new headquarters for the Wessex Reserve Forces and Cadet Association in Chambers Close.
An EDDC spokesman said: “The long-term future of the site has not been decided, but it is proposed it should form part of a wider opportunity to re-generate this part of the seafront. In the meantime, the building will remain as it is until a planning application comes forward for an alternative use.”
Minutes of a meeting on November 30 show cabinet members resolved the hall should be demolished to avoid maintenance costs.


Bid to save ‘iconic’ Sidmouth seafront building - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald 

Shock change of plan for Drill Hall
11 March 2013 

Stefan Gordon
Alex Vick's alternative designs for the Drill Hall have got the town talking
SIDMOUTH’S Drill Hall has been granted a stay of execution in response to calls from campaigners to save the seafront building from demolition and refurbish it for community use.
In the short term, the council’s intention had been to demolish the hall and allow boat parking on the levelled site. Around £11,000 was spent on removing asbestos in December.


Shock change of plan for Drill Hall - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald 

Port Royal future: ‘Let’s get the community on board’
09 April 2013
Stefan Gordon
Sidmouth, Port Royal. Picture by Alex Walton. 
RESIDENTS have been challenged to come up with ideas on how to change the face of Sidmouth seafront by driving forces striving for a people-powered regeneration of Port Royal. A once-shelved brief put together by a group of community members was this week hailed as a ‘starting-point’ in a move it is hoped will kick-start a long-awaited scheme for the area.
Sidmouth Town Council has vowed to engage with district authority bosses to develop proposals for the site – and civic leaders say public consultation will be ‘key’.
The Port Royal Steering Group (PRSG) dossier describes – but does not promote – a range of options, including high-rise, luxury flats, a pedestrian-friendly ‘leisure’ retreat, the detailed reworking of the Ham car parks and the introduction of a jetty for waterborne transport links. The conservation and refurbishment of the Drill Hall, or its demolition to make way for a more expensive regeneration of the whole area while retaining current uses, are also featured.
The only option ruled out on the grounds of ‘physical geography and costs’ is a substantial marina.


Port Royal future: ‘Let’s get the community on board’ - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald 

Inspiring residents will secure Drill Hall future
19 April 2013
Stephen Sumner
Drill Hall campaigners want to give an inspiring vision to capture the imaginations of Sidmouth residents and get their backing. 
An open meeting on Tuesday brought together local activists with representatives of FolkWeek and cycling charity Sustrans.
Campaign leader Matt Booth led discussions on how to move forward after the building’s stay of demolition, including reaching a purported £440,000 asking price. 
He said the site could make a developer ‘five or 10 million’ pounds, but the cost to the town would be greater than that. The Drill Hall advocate added that there may be some debate over who owns it, or what the draft Local Plan has in store for Port Royal, but that should not make them falter.
...a potential cycle link from Feniton to Sidmouth. The latter idea was backed by Michael Brittain, of Sustrans, and the Drill Hall could benefit from its bid for cash from the Coastal Communities Fund.
Businessman Richard Eley said the asking price was likely to be £440,000, because that was the price that was previously paid for it, and the people of Sidmouth would get the first chance to buy it, ahead of any developers.

Inspiring residents will secure Drill Hall future - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald

Etc, etc...
Sea Fest is a splash hit! - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (April 2014)
The real issue going on here... - Letters - Sidmouth Herald (May 2014)
Drill Hall facts - Letters - Sidmouth Herald (May 2014)
Council marks time on old Drill Hall blueprint - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (June 2014)
‘Drill Hall must not hinder future plans at Port Royal’ - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Oct 2014)
Drill Hall campaigners share vision at new HQ - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (June 2015)
‘War’ cry over future of eastern town - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Oct 2015)
Hugo Swire’s multi-storey ‘big vision’ for Sidmouth - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Nov 2015)
Re-imagining Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Jan 2016)
Streetlife users share ideas for Re-imagining Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Jan 2016)
Neighbourhood plan: ‘Chance for Sidmouth to move ahead together’ - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Feb 2016)
Campaigners make case for Sidmouth’s Drill Hall - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (March 2016)
Global interest in competition to ‘re-imagine’ Sidmouth - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (March 2016)
Flood prevention and Sidmouth east should be developed together says MP - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (April 2016)
Storm over leaflet about future of Sidmouth seafront - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Aug 2016)
Will the Ham be in Sidmouth redevelopment plan? - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Oct 2016)
Exciting plans to protect and promote Sidmouth’s unique coastal heritage - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (March 2017)
First look at plans for Sidmouth’s Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (June 2017)
‘Predictable’, ‘too big’, ‘great’ - reaction to Port Royal proposal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (July 2017)
‘Retain, refurbish, re-use’ - campaigners’ alternative vision for Sidmouth’s Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (July 2017)
Graham shares alternative vision for Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (July 2017)
SVA weighs in on plans for Sidmouth’s Port Royal - Latest Sidmouth and Ottery News - Sidmouth Herald (Aug 2017)
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